Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students

Part One: Blacks Vote for Public Education, Win a Separate but Unequal Place in the New School System When Asheville went to the polls in July 1887 and narrowly approved a resolution establishing tax-supported public schools, black voters provided the crucial margin of support. The city took this step forward during an era of educational … Continue reading Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students

Did your African American Ancestor March From Asheville to Volunteer in the Spanish American War?

In our recent post "PART 2: A WHO’S WHO LIST OF PROMINENT BLACK ASHEVILLE BUSINESSMEN IN 1922" we were giving the story of Noah Murrough and said that he had joined the Maceo Volunteers, a company of “colored men under Capt. Thomas L. Leatherwood” that left Asheville in July 1898 for Cuba. It occured to me … Continue reading Did your African American Ancestor March From Asheville to Volunteer in the Spanish American War?

A Kenilworth Research Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

"View of the Mountains from a Villa in Kenilworth, Asheville, NC" Postcard Of all the communities on our list, one of the most photographed besides Downtown Asheville, may be Kenilworth. This Asheville Suburb in the southeast part of the city sprung onto the scene in the late 1910's and rose in popularity into the 1920's … Continue reading A Kenilworth Research Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Part 2: A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

Or . . ."How Well Do You Know Black Asheville History?" "Colored Race Prospers in Asheville as the Result of Attitude of White Citizens" was the title of an article published in an Asheville Citizen-Times on December 3, 1922.  "While it would be difficult indeed to mention in a short article the numerous successful business … Continue reading Part 2: A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

Or . . ."How Well Do You Know Black Asheville History?" "Colored Race Prospers in Asheville as the Result of Attitude of White Citizens" was the title of an article published in an Asheville Citizen-Times on December 3, 1922.  "While it would be difficult indeed to mention in a short article the numerous successful business … Continue reading A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

“We found all in Fellowship” at Flat Creek: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

One of the resources hiding away in the North Carolina Room reference stacks are various church histories and minutes. Most of the time, these valuable records sit around on the shelf and do not see much use. If you think about it, it’s easy to understand why. On the surface, it may not seem like … Continue reading “We found all in Fellowship” at Flat Creek: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

“A Tribute to the Stephens-Lee High School” is Now on Video

"A Tribute to the Stephens-Lee High School" as presented by the North Carolina Room on April 9, 2019 at the Stephens-Lee Center is now on video! Here's a call out to black Asheville. here's the goal: LET'S DOCUMENT EVERY FACULTY MEMBER WHO EVER TAUGHT AT STEPHENS-LEE! What better way to honor these people who gave … Continue reading “A Tribute to the Stephens-Lee High School” is Now on Video

A Garage, A Block, A Door…The East End: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Today's blog is slightly different than other 52 Weeks, 52 Communities posts. This week, the author chose to write an essay about her personal connection to the East End Community. When I was very small, my Uncle Boozer was the biggest man I had ever known. When we gathered for family suppers, Thanksgiving, Christmas, funerals, … Continue reading A Garage, A Block, A Door…The East End: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

“Keep My Name in Remembrance,” Dillingham: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

“Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar, which is in the king's dale: …and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom's place.” 2 Samuel 18:18 Though he died in 1838, by 1887 Absalom Dillingham managed, in his own way, … Continue reading “Keep My Name in Remembrance,” Dillingham: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities