ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Four: Builders of Black Schools (Continued)

"Asheville from Beaucatcher," published by Taylor & Jones, Land of the Sky, Beauties of Western North Carolina and Northeast Georgia, Class D. The photo was taken before the original Battery Park Hotel was built in 1886. A200-5 In our last post in this series on early black public schools, we looked at the lives and … Continue reading ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Four: Builders of Black Schools (Continued)

ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Three: Builders of Black Schools

The Creation of a Public School System for the City of Asheville, 1887-1888 Looking down on Asheville with a distant view of the first Battery Park Hotel built in 1886. Eagle Street is in the center of the photo curving around a stand of trees. L473-8 Setting Up the System and Hiring the Teachers Asheville … Continue reading ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Three: Builders of Black Schools

Join the Friends of the NC Room for THREE events in October!

Thursday October 17- Sunday October 20: OUT! A Pop Up Exhibit featuring material from our LGBT+ Archives Thursday, October 24, 6-7 pm: The Ravenscroft Reserve October 30: The Panoramic Photos of Herbert W. Pelton ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Thursday October 17- Sunday October 20: OUT! A Pop Up Exhibit featuring material from our LGBT+ Archives OUT! A Pop … Continue reading Join the Friends of the NC Room for THREE events in October!

Hall’s 7 Acres in Newfound: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Map of the Newfound Community from a 1966 Newfound Community Club Scrapbook, MS306.001 pp 02. Throughout the year as I’ve continued to work on this series and it has gained traction and popularity, hints and suggestions as to what I should write about have come in from various sources. It has been a tremendous undertaking, … Continue reading Hall’s 7 Acres in Newfound: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

His Name Was Leicester: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Disclaimer: This installment of 52 Weeks, 52 Communities has no ill intent. Indeed, I mean to shame no one in my assertions, only educate. However, be warned, I may air some grievances. Portion of MAP501 showing Leicester Township and surrounding area. Ca. 1903. Dear readers, there are a few things that send unpleasant chills down … Continue reading His Name Was Leicester: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

A Kenilworth Research Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

"View of the Mountains from a Villa in Kenilworth, Asheville, NC" Postcard Of all the communities on our list, one of the most photographed besides Downtown Asheville, may be Kenilworth. This Asheville Suburb in the southeast part of the city sprung onto the scene in the late 1910's and rose in popularity into the 1920's … Continue reading A Kenilworth Research Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Stumping for Suffrage in Jackson Park (Woolsey): 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

If you live in Asheville, you’ve probably taken a drive through it many times. Say, you’re headed to the Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary for a Sunday stroll after a brunch downtown. It is a section of Merrimon Avenue that begins descending in elevation starting somewhere about the time you reach Brookstone Church (formerly Merrimon Ave. … Continue reading Stumping for Suffrage in Jackson Park (Woolsey): 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Cousin Caney the Corrupt Commissioner and the Brand New Emma-Leicester Road: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Emma is a small community in western Buncombe County that sits nestled between Dryman Mountain and the French Broad River. If you wanted to put a pushpin on a map, you’d place it on the crossroads at North Louisiana and Emma Road (SR 1338). Today, the intersection maintains some character of the old and the … Continue reading Cousin Caney the Corrupt Commissioner and the Brand New Emma-Leicester Road: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

The Littlest Library You Ever Saw: 52 Weeks 52 Communities

Did you ever visit the Broad River Community Library? The tiny little library in this rural southeast Buncombe County community first made an appearance thanks to the New Deal-era program called the WPA or Works Progress Administration. The WPA funded all manner of social programs, including arts and literary efforts, like rural libraries. The Broad River … Continue reading The Littlest Library You Ever Saw: 52 Weeks 52 Communities