Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students, Part Four: Builders of Black Schools (concluded)

This installment offers a look at the life and career of the fifth of the five original teachers at Asheville’s first black city school, Beaumont Street. We’ve saved one of the best teachers for last. We’ve also included information on the members of her family because of their prominence in Asheville and their connections to … Continue reading Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students, Part Four: Builders of Black Schools (concluded)

A “Worst” Asheville Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

I remember “worst” Asheville. It’s the neighborhood where my Grandfather was born in a house with dirt floors, where I went to preschool (back when Crossroads Assembly was "West Asheville Assembly" located on Haywood Rd.), attended my first dance lessons (in the building where Asheville Greenworks is today), and went along with my mother to … Continue reading A “Worst” Asheville Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Southside: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

"Skatemobiles" by Andrea Clark. ACC 57-08 Henry Robinson wrote in 1992 about his childhood community of Southside--a mournful eulogy really, to a place that no longer exists--that the sprawling community "stretched over 400 acres from Biltmore Avenue westward to the French Broad River." Robinson informs us today that it was "the largest residential area for … Continue reading Southside: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Walter H. Page and His Christmas Letter To His Grandson

Who was Walter H. Page? Did you ever wonder who Page Avenue was named for? E.W. Grove named the street in his downtown development for the publisher, writer and ambassador to Great Britain during World War I, Walter Hines Page. Page was born at what is now Cary, NC in 1855. He was one of the … Continue reading Walter H. Page and His Christmas Letter To His Grandson

ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Four: Builders of Black Schools (Continued)

"Asheville from Beaucatcher," published by Taylor & Jones, Land of the Sky, Beauties of Western North Carolina and Northeast Georgia, Class D. The photo was taken before the original Battery Park Hotel was built in 1886. A200-5 In our last post in this series on early black public schools, we looked at the lives and … Continue reading ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Four: Builders of Black Schools (Continued)

ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Three: Builders of Black Schools

The Creation of a Public School System for the City of Asheville, 1887-1888 Looking down on Asheville with a distant view of the first Battery Park Hotel built in 1886. Eagle Street is in the center of the photo curving around a stand of trees. L473-8 Setting Up the System and Hiring the Teachers Asheville … Continue reading ASHEVILLE’S FIRST CITY SCHOOLS FOR BLACK STUDENTS, Part Three: Builders of Black Schools

EVENT–THE PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPHS OF HERBERT PELTON: ASHEVILLE 1905-1930 BY BENJAMIN PORTER

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 30, 2019 FROM 6:00 TO 7:00 PM LORD AUDITORIUM PACK MEMORIAL LIBRARY LOWER LEVEL THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Light Refreshments will be served H. W. Pelton panoramic photograph of Pack Square from the north centered on the Vance Monument, 1910. B440-XX The photograph above is probably one of … Continue reading EVENT–THE PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPHS OF HERBERT PELTON: ASHEVILLE 1905-1930 BY BENJAMIN PORTER

The Ravenscroft Reserve: Its History and Importance

Presentation This Thursday, October 24 from 6:00-7:00 Pack Memorial Library, Lord Auditorium, lower level. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Where is the Ravenscroft Reserve? The Ravenscroft Reserve is located at 11 Collier Avenue north of Banks Avenue, at the southern end of Ravenscroft Drive. The … Continue reading The Ravenscroft Reserve: Its History and Importance

Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students Part Two: African Americans Help Build the City and Its School System

View published in Asheville News and Hotel Reporter, vol. 3, no. 9, March 28, 1896. Nazareth First Baptist Church (Pine Street at Beaumont & Hazzard Streets) right of center. Hazzard Street down and left from the church into Valley Street. M681-DS Part One of this series began with a survey of private and religious efforts … Continue reading Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students Part Two: African Americans Help Build the City and Its School System