Historical House Hunting in Kimberly: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

A Residential Street Scene, Kimberly Heights. Postcard. AC615. We’re over halfway there, folks! Here we are on community #34/52.  And a few times throughout this series, we’ve taken the opportunity to teach you a little bit about how to most effectively use your time in the archives or navigate our public database, Presto, to do … Continue reading Historical House Hunting in Kimberly: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Did your African American Ancestor March From Asheville to Volunteer in the Spanish American War?

In our recent post "PART 2: A WHO’S WHO LIST OF PROMINENT BLACK ASHEVILLE BUSINESSMEN IN 1922" we were giving the story of Noah Murrough and said that he had joined the Maceo Volunteers, a company of “colored men under Capt. Thomas L. Leatherwood” that left Asheville in July 1898 for Cuba. It occured to me … Continue reading Did your African American Ancestor March From Asheville to Volunteer in the Spanish American War?

A Kenilworth Research Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

"View of the Mountains from a Villa in Kenilworth, Asheville, NC" Postcard Of all the communities on our list, one of the most photographed besides Downtown Asheville, may be Kenilworth. This Asheville Suburb in the southeast part of the city sprung onto the scene in the late 1910's and rose in popularity into the 1920's … Continue reading A Kenilworth Research Album: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Part 2: A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

Or . . ."How Well Do You Know Black Asheville History?" "Colored Race Prospers in Asheville as the Result of Attitude of White Citizens" was the title of an article published in an Asheville Citizen-Times on December 3, 1922.  "While it would be difficult indeed to mention in a short article the numerous successful business … Continue reading Part 2: A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

Lost Communities of a Consolidated Jupiter: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

“[Jupiter] received its name in about 1885 or 1888, by Old North McCLean (sic), he being the first post master. His theory for naming the settlement Jupiter was that it is of a very high altitude and from the post office you could gain a very plain view of the Jupiter star that rose in the north east. There was about three or four men present at the time… they agreed and it was called ‘Jupiter Post Office.’”

A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

Or . . ."How Well Do You Know Black Asheville History?" "Colored Race Prospers in Asheville as the Result of Attitude of White Citizens" was the title of an article published in an Asheville Citizen-Times on December 3, 1922.  "While it would be difficult indeed to mention in a short article the numerous successful business … Continue reading A Who’s Who List of Prominent Black Asheville Businessmen in 1922

Stumping for Suffrage in Jackson Park (Woolsey): 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

If you live in Asheville, you’ve probably taken a drive through it many times. Say, you’re headed to the Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary for a Sunday stroll after a brunch downtown. It is a section of Merrimon Avenue that begins descending in elevation starting somewhere about the time you reach Brookstone Church (formerly Merrimon Ave. … Continue reading Stumping for Suffrage in Jackson Park (Woolsey): 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Hommoney, Hominey, or Hominy? : 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

hominy: n. hulled Indian corn, coarsely ground or broken, used as a cereal and as a vegetable. OR Hominy: two townships in Buncombe County--Upper Hominy and Lower Hominy--are  collectively referred to as Hominy Valley.  Hominy Creek runs from the Haywood County line and meanders through the valley until it joins the French Broad River at … Continue reading Hommoney, Hominey, or Hominy? : 52 Weeks, 52 Communities