The Ravenscroft Reserve: Its History and Importance

Presentation This Thursday, October 24 from 6:00-7:00 Pack Memorial Library, Lord Auditorium, lower level. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Where is the Ravenscroft Reserve? The Ravenscroft Reserve is located at 11 Collier Avenue north of Banks Avenue, at the southern end of Ravenscroft Drive. The … Continue reading The Ravenscroft Reserve: Its History and Importance

Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students Part Two: African Americans Help Build the City and Its School System

View published in Asheville News and Hotel Reporter, vol. 3, no. 9, March 28, 1896. Nazareth First Baptist Church (Pine Street at Beaumont & Hazzard Streets) right of center. Hazzard Street down and left from the church into Valley Street. M681-DS Part One of this series began with a survey of private and religious efforts … Continue reading Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students Part Two: African Americans Help Build the City and Its School System

Join the Friends of the NC Room for THREE events in October!

Thursday October 17- Sunday October 20: OUT! A Pop Up Exhibit featuring material from our LGBT+ Archives Thursday, October 24, 6-7 pm: The Ravenscroft Reserve October 30: The Panoramic Photos of Herbert W. Pelton ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Thursday October 17- Sunday October 20: OUT! A Pop Up Exhibit featuring material from our LGBT+ Archives OUT! A Pop … Continue reading Join the Friends of the NC Room for THREE events in October!

Hall’s 7 Acres in Newfound: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Map of the Newfound Community from a 1966 Newfound Community Club Scrapbook, MS306.001 pp 02. Throughout the year as I’ve continued to work on this series and it has gained traction and popularity, hints and suggestions as to what I should write about have come in from various sources. It has been a tremendous undertaking, … Continue reading Hall’s 7 Acres in Newfound: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Greetings From Montreat: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Nestled in a cove in the eastern end of Buncombe County lies the tiny town of Montreat. The town has only been officially incorporated since 1967, but the community has been around much longer. Montreat began in the late 19th century as an annual Presbyterian camp meeting, and by 1905, congregants had established the Montreat … Continue reading Greetings From Montreat: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

A Montford Bibliography: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Map of a Subdivision within the Montford Neighborhood. MAP402. Montford is one of Buncombe County’s most iconic historic neighborhoods. In this installment of 52 Weeks, 52 Communities, we could take almost any angle on Montford; there is just so much to talk about. So instead of trying to pick just one thesis, I decided that … Continue reading A Montford Bibliography: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Becoming a “Townie” in Malvern Hills: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Portion of an advertisement for Malvern Hills, Asheville Citizen, 1925. Pleasant Alexander Calhoun lived most of his adult life in a place Horace Kephart described as the “back of beyond.” Until the beginning of the 20th century, it was so remote that few outsiders had ever ventured into the isolated community nestled deep in the Great Smoky Mountains. It's not probable that … Continue reading Becoming a “Townie” in Malvern Hills: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

An Objectionable Designation, Limestone: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

"Running up and down Cane Creek . . . is a wide belt of lime rock from which, for more than a century, quicklime has been manufactured in large quantities on Cane Creek by burning. . . . From this belt of lime rock Limestone Creek, once known by an objectionable designation, takes its name … Continue reading An Objectionable Designation, Limestone: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students

Part One: Blacks Vote for Public Education, Win a Separate but Unequal Place in the New School System When Asheville went to the polls in July 1887 and narrowly approved a resolution establishing tax-supported public schools, black voters provided the crucial margin of support. The city took this step forward during an era of educational … Continue reading Asheville’s First City Schools for Black Students